The 50 hour work week is dying and here is why

So many of us gen-z and millennials will be the last generation to own their own home (not an apartment) if they are lucky. And with inflation and high stress and anxiety in work environments, we are beginning to value our time more than the money we make. Because realistically money is becoming less and less valuable. Retirement is no longer a sure thing and owning your own home or even being able to pay off your mortgage and keep your lifestyle is very unrealistic for an average two-person income household of $120k. So why work, work, work, retire and dye. When we can live a little more?

Working all your life

I clicked on the video, sitting there watching listening trying to learn and get inspired when these words hit me like a tone of bricks. It’s something I never thought of, I’ve been working my whole life, saving, investing, trying to get close to retirement when Warren Buffets words sink in. “If you don’t find a way to make money while you sleep, you will work until you die.”

Gear isn’t finite

I’m going to show you what gear I use. And I also want you to know that gear isn’t finite, it changes over time. And that all this gear that you see in front of you, sure it helps in capturing a picture but it’s not the end all be all. Gear, settings, controls, styles, are all concerns of the hobbyist and amateur, they are good to know and important but they aren’t what makes a picture great. the story, the meaning, the purpose is what makes an image.

What is the value of a photograph?

When it comes to art or creativity it’s subjective. And art is only worth what your willing to pay for it. One person’s monthly income is another persons pocket change. Personal style, preference and tastes vast dramatically from age, culture, social groups and geolocation. So can one find a baseline for what a photo is really worth to the user in today’s economy? And answer the question, what is the value of a photograph really worth?

The problem when you work for money

I’m a full-time photographer, I take photos for a living. It’s my main source of income. Its how I pay the rent, keep the lights on and put food on the table. The problem when you work for money, specifically when you get paid for your photography, is that you are no longer in full control.

I bet a lot of you will counter-argue that you get to choose your clients, and you get to express your creativity. How and what you shoot and what you let out into the world is filtered through you. I get that, your not wrong. But when you exchange your services for some kind of transaction there is an expectation, and agreement, and understanding or contract. Agreeing to provide your services instantly limits you. Now limitations are great, they help creativity, they force you to think outside the box. But getting paid for your services also pigeonholes you into a specific expectation. You no longer have freedom.

AB Watson

Success in photography

What does success in photography really even mean? It might be to make a living at photography or to get 10k followers on Instagram. Or perhaps you want to become a part of the Magnum photographers agency. But when we take a closer look at the dictionary meaning of ‘success’ the meaning is open. So what does it really mean to become a success in photography?