The best point-and-shoot camera I’ve owned

I’ve been around for a while; all 36 years, and during that time I’ve accumulated and used a number of point-and-shoot cameras, from the film days to the adoption of digital. And I can honestly say after using, Yashica, Ricoh, Leica, Fuji, Kodak, Olympic, Canon & Contex my favourite point-and-shoot camera can be summed up into these categories; ease of use, quality, features and size. It would have to be the…

A fresh start

A new system and a fresh start. These past two years I had a News Years resolution to do less, and play more. What I didn’t realise was that what I stopped doing was what brought joy to my life. And playing games isolated me more and removed me from responsibilities. So like a good person in a capitalist society I purchased a new/old camera.

How to find your photography style fast?

How to find your photography style fast? Let’s not waste any time, what is the most important element in someone’s photography style? The quick answer is repetition. What do you do the most and consistently, that will define your style. What comes naturally to you will ultimately become your style. Your default, or to put nicely who you really are and how you see the world will ultimately mould your photography style.

Why I use a Leica Rangefinder

I’ve had a lot of negative feedback about my choice of a camera when compared to alternative brands and image capture devices. All these judgments are valid and have good arguments in regards to the available choices from DSLR, mirrorless, point and shoots or smartphones for that matter. But I thought I would explain my reasoning on why I use a Leica rangefinder.

Technology has no soul

As soon as you start talking about the technical side of photography you start turning away from the most important aspect of photos, telling stories. Technology is and isn’t important when it comes to photography. No one care what camera or lighting you used except other photographers. I’m a big believer in the older you get the wiser you get, the less insecure you get, and the less you care about gear. Technology has no soul and here is why.

Looking back at my first camera

It’s a humble experience to find your first camera. The camera that started your journey and curiosity in photography. I was curious to find that almost nothing was different from my old camera, regarding specs. The only main thing that changed was that whole film into digital thing, that’s about it. So if the only major change in a camera that was released in 1976 to my current camera was the conversion to digital. Why was my photography so different, from inception to present? It made me wonder, I pondered over this revelation, till it came to me. The most important thing to a photographers development was their experiences.

One camera one voice

I only use one camera body and one lens, because I only have one voice and one point of view. Most photographers use a variety of equipment and effects to best capture a subject. To say something unique and different for each moment. Wanting to tell a story in a unique way from everyone else. But is this necessary, isn’t your point of view enough?

Is your camera obsolete

Pick up your camera, hold it, look at it, and ask yourself is my camera obsolete. Does it no longer achieve what I require from it? Chances are you can think of a few things your camera needs. But if you’re being honest with yourself you’re just comparing your current camera with another. We all compare, we all want something someone else has. We want abundance, more, the newest shiny whatever. But when you think about purpose, function, getting the job done. Do you really need that new camera or camera model upgrade?

Find your Zen camera

When I talk to people about gear, what they think they need, want or have, I find that it consistently changes from person to person. Most peoples dream camera changes from year to year. So how do you get over Gear Acquisition Syndrome (G.A.S) and find your Zen camera?