Incremental steps

We have all done new years resolutions. The day before or the week after we all come up with the most stereotype goals, mainly all physical or finical. That first month most of us stick to it. Getting past February is amazing if you’re still in there, but here is where most of us lose focus or motivation to continue as we aren’t seeing results. Heres how to stick with it till you start seeing results and your goals are achieved.

How to find your photography style fast?

How to find your photography style fast? Let’s not waste any time, what is the most important element in someone’s photography style? The quick answer is repetition. What do you do the most and consistently, that will define your style. What comes naturally to you will ultimately become your style. Your default, or to put nicely who you really are and how you see the world will ultimately mould your photography style.

I’m not shooting enough

I’m not shooting enough photographs. We have all heard the film argument about how it slows you down and you take fewer photos. I get that, but there is a difference between shooting less and shooting a lot and shooting a lot of the same exact scene. Instead of machinegun photographing a subject, take a photograph and recompose to tell a story. What I’m getting at is I’m not taking enough photographs, I’m not producing enough content.

Life, randomness and sales

We all like to think that life is guided, destiny or gods will. But in truth life is random. The counter-argument is I make my own luck or I have worked hard to get to where I am. I met the love of my life, it was meant to be. But statistically, to find your ideal partner it’s only 1 in 100. Knowing this you could successfully find the ideal partner for you to mate with, marry or find your so-called soul mate in the dating game. Not very romantic but never the less true. The same goes for your success, statistics never lie, they just aren’t sexy.

Why I got rid of my photography gear. (revisited)

I had everything I could ever need, all the dream gear. Broncolor lighting, the latest professional Canon cameras along with all the faster canon lenses. I had the latest Apple laptop, tethering equipment, software, c-stands, tripods, light modifiers, Polaroid cameras, all the gear I could have ever dreamed of. I had it all, and at that time it was good, better than good it was extraordinary. So why did I later decide to get rid of everything I work so hard to obtain, and only after a few years after having it?

AB Watson

Reasoning by first principles vs by analogy

For most of us, we end up reasoning by analogy because we’ve had the ‘why’ question beaten out of us. Naturally, we are born with reasoning by first principles, but our parents, guardians, teacher and mentors eventual put their foot down and say something like because I said so. Our curious mind and quest for reason and answers are destroyed by an authority. Do as I say, because I said so, don’t question me, I’m the chef, your just the cook follow the recipe.

How to create a photography style

You have found your style when you can’t do anything else. It’s your default your normal your nature. Style comes when imitation and influence perish. Its something that becomes one… you, yours. Defining your style or finding your style is a life’s journey. I hope you are always evolving and changing, never stagnant when it comes to your style. But at the same time hold onto its structure, it’s roots, its essence. So where does one begin? How does one create a photography style?

The photography genre minimalism

It’s no lie that Minimalism is the direct contrast and was brought to light from the juxtaposition of over-consumption. All trends start from the opposite, a rebellious movement around social norms. Minimalism isn’t new, its aesthetic has been around since the 1600s from Japan. Then later the word ‘minimalism’ was coined as an art movement in the 1960s. Today it is associated with an aesthetic and the juxtaposition of hoarders. But what I am interested about the photography genre minimalism is the appeal. The need, want and visually pleasing nature of minimalism.

Your perception is everything

Photography is about perception, not gear. Imitating or doing an iteration of someone else’s work is a quick way to a dead-end. Whilst replicating someone else’s work is a great way to learn technical skills, it’s nothing more. Instead, focus on developing your own perception, that’s the true road towards your own unique body of work.

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